The Ultimate Guide to Compare Power Companies in New Zealand 2023

Nov 29, 2022
power
Staff Writer

This reliable guide will help you compare power prices with confidence and help you find the best power provider for your home. Within this guide, you will find comparisons of power rates in New Zealand from companies such as Genesis Energy, Contact Energy, Mercury Energy, TrustPower, Meridian Energy, Electric Kiwi, Flick Electric and other providers. Our broad review of companies ensures that you’re getting full coverage of all major cities in New Zealand.

Key Takeaways

It’s not a surprise that it can be difficult to compare power companies given that there are so many options. With many different types of plans available, some being fixed and some variable, it’s hard to understand which plan and company are the best fit to your requirements and offer the best value. That said, the most satisfied customers are the ones who spend a few extra minutes making sure they get the better deal in the long-term - especially with regards to electricity price rises.

The purpose of this guide is to bring clarity to your choice of power provider, to give you the confidence to make a well-informed decision and to give you the tools to be able to compare the best of all NZ power companies. Best of all, this guide will let you know exactly what you’re paying because you will be able to pre-confirm your power company rates with us here before you commit to anything. While most of the plans are variable, we have made sure to highlight fixed-term plans for you as well. 

Why Have We Published This Guide?

Simple. 

We are concerned with the lack of transparency of the current comparison tools available on the market, limiting the ability of the average New Zealander to find the best power company for their living situation. Most tools that let you compare power companies produce different results and can make it harder to compare power rates, getting in the way of making the best choice possible for your whānau. In many cases, only a few power providers are compared, when there are a multitude of them available. 

In developing this guide, we have you – the consumer – in mind. We want to make sure that you have the most complete information out there. In saying that, your first step should always be to compare power prices of your existing provider with leading power companies in NZ to get a good understanding on where you are currently placed.

After reading our guide you should be able to contact any power provider as an informed and confident consumer. In particular:

  1. You will be able to compare power prices and understand how power pricing works across all power providers and across all major cities all over New Zealand. This will put you into the best position possible when choosing power plans.

  2. You will become knowledgeable in energy prices in your area and will be able to switch or join a new power provider with full confidence that you are getting the best power deals. An average home has the potential to save between $100 and in excess of $1,000 a year on power, if making calculated and smart power provider decisions.

  3. The best way to maximise value and save money is to continuously compare power prices, switching to the best provider at the time and continue re-assessing your power provider and their power plans annually (or whenever your contract is at an end). Keeping up to date with power providers and their pricing will ensure you are not overpaying!

In our guide you will find information on:

  1. How electricity is priced

  2. Power company price comparisons

  3. Reading and understanding your power bill

  4. Electricity bill FAQs

Electricity Prices in NZ - Why is it so Expensive?

New Zealand is relatively uniquely placed, in that the majority of our power (specifically around 60% of power) comes from hydroelectric power schemes, which has a direct impact on power prices in New Zealand. Together with New Zealand’s long-term issue of poorly insulated homes and the need for healthy and sustainable usage of our lakes, the demand for power is consistently high. On the other hand, the real cost of generation of electricity for hydroelectric power is very low. 

To make sure that the high demand and cheap cost of generation doesn’t translate into high rates of return, the electricity generators have revalued their hydro stations to a point where they can now claim that their return on asset value is only average (or in some cases very low). 

Ultimately, this means that many people end up overpaying for electricity when the reality is that the power has cost them so much less.

Save Money by Being Fully Informed

The first (and most important) step to finding the best power prices in NZ is to set aside loyalty to your current electricity provider and start comparing your pricing. Only through comparing can you become fully informed about whether or not you have the best rates in New Zealand available to you. Below, we look at Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin to help you understand your current pricing and offers. This guide is applicable to both residential customers and business customers.

How is Electricity Priced and What That Means for Your Power Bill

Before you dive into your power bill, it’s important that you understand the basics:

  1. Every power bill is made of up of two components – a fixed daily charge and a variable charge. A variable charge is the cost of the amount of electricity you consume in a month, whereas the daily fixed charge covers the fixed cost of supplying energy to your property.

  2. The variable charge rate will vary significantly depending on your power plan. Specifically, whether it’s a low user or a standard user plan.  A low user is any electricity customer who uses a relatively small amount of power. Low user electricity plans have a lower daily charge and a higher variable usage charge.

    In the North Island, you are considered a low user if you use less than 8,000 kWh annually at your primary residence (666 kWh a month), while in the lower parts of the South Island you are a low user if you less than 9,000 kWh per year (750 kWh a month).

    A standard user plan has a higher daily charge and a lower variable usage charge, making it the most cost-effective option for most people.

    You are a standard user if you use more than 8,000 kWh per year at your primary residence in the North Island or more than 9,000 kWh annually in the southern regions of the South Island.

  3. Despite the name, a fixed daily charge varies from low to standard users. In particular, low users pay around 60 cents + GST per day (this charge used to be 30 cents per day prior to April 2022). Standard users pay more depending on where they live in New Zealand.

​Energy Charges Explained:

  1. Unit Charge (kWh): A kilowatt hour (kWh) is a measure of how much energy you’re using and is usually anywhere from $0.15 to $0.25. 

    For example, a 2,000 watt dishwasher would use 1 kWh in just half an hour. If you turned on the dishwasher for an hour, you would be charged the kWh fee. In saying that, even if you are not using the dishwasher (or any other appliance) but you leave it on standby, you can still be charged as the appliance will continue creating a kWh electricity cost on your energy bill.

  2. Daily Charge: This is a daily fee charged back to the customer for being connected to the provider. This is usually somewhere between 60 cents and around $2.00.

  3. Electricity Authority (EA) Levy: The EA charges a small fee per kWh consumed to fund its role in administering industry obligations and voluntary guidelines that the retailers must follow. These include standards for the contracts retailers have with their customers. 

    The levy is directly charged to industry participants. They may pass this cost on to consumers - this means a power bill could show the levy, or it could be included in other costs.

  4. GST: GST is added to the total costs of 1-3 above.

The Makeup of Your Power Bill

The next step in understanding power bills (and saving money on power) is to understand what elements make up the cost of power and how that relates to electricity prices in New Zealand.

Below is a simplified version of how the money you pay is distributed on the electricity bill:

  • 32% - Is the cost of generating the electricity you use

  • 27% - Is the cost of distribution required to build and maintain the power lines that transport electricity from where it is generated to your house

  • 13% - Is the cost your retail company charges you for providing the service

  • 15% - GST (Goods and Services Tax)

  • 10.5% - Is the cost of transmission, used for expanding and maintaining the national power grid

  • 3.5% - Is the cost of reading and maintaining your electricity usage meter, smart or analogue

  • 0.5% - Is the cost of regulation of the electricity industry by the Electricity Authority

  • 0.5% - Is the operating cost of day-to-day running of the electricity market

Of note:

  1. Lowering your energy consumption in kilowatts per hour will help you save on power. However, switching providers continues to be the best way to get the most value for money and bring about the most benefit to you.

  2. While retailers can use different names for the same terms, it’s important to know that your electricity invoice is regulated and must show fixed and variable costs applied. If ever in doubt, call your power provider to confirm, this will ensure you are well equipped to compare power prices as required.

  3. You should be mindful of your electricity cost per kWh throughout the year as the total energy consumption (units) continues to be the highest charge you will see on your bill.​

  4. Every year, around 1 April, electricity companies nationwide compare power prices and review their current set prices. The result is typically an increase in prices for consumers, even if the electricity retailer itself doesn’t increase its own prices.

Understanding Your Electricity Usage Meter

Smart Meters vs Analogue Meters

  • More than 80% of New Zealand homes now have smart meters installed. While analogue electricity meters are being phased out, it’s still helpful to know the difference and understand not only the benefits of having a smart electricity meter but also what the electricity meter measures.

  • Analogue electricity meters are useful for monitoring electricity use on a periodic basis and for checking the accuracy of electric bills from month to month. Analogue electricity meters have multiple spinning dials, which are best read by qualified electricity company representatives.

  • Analogue electricity usage meters have one purpose – to tell the consumer or meter reader how much electricity has been used since the last reading.

  • Digital or “smart electricity meters” record daily electricity use and share information about consumption between users and electricity suppliers over wireless digital radio frequency networks.

  • Such an interactive capability also allows power companies to manage energy use and adjust loads during periods when there is a danger of a potential system overload, such as during periods of extremely hot or cold weather.

Meter Types

There are many different specific types of meters on the market available to New Zealanders for use. The type of meter you currently have installed on your property will dictate what kind of variable charge your power providers will apply to your bill. Understanding these different types of meters will help you find the best power deal in New Zealand.

In summary, the main point of difference is whether the meter is:

  • Controlled - the energy company can restrict or control its supply;
  • Uncontrolled - you personally have a constant and unrestricted supply to the meter; or
  • Part controlled - a combination of both controlled and uncontrolled.

Most homes in New Zealand have two meters installed, each serving a particular purpose - one controlled (for example to heat the hot water) and one uncontrolled (for example for house lighting).

The most common meters are discussed below.

  1. Controlled meter (also called Economy)
    • A controlled meter (often paired with an uncontrolled meter) is a meter set up for a dedicated energy supply to a specific appliance (commonly your water heating) for anywhere between 8-20 hours per day.

    • This meter is "controlled" by the electricity company during peak hours to ease demand on the local grid.

    • Controlled meters are much cheaper than meters that provide a continuous supply of electricity.

    • What this means is that electricity supply to a specific appliance can be turned off during peak hours for an allocated period determined by the electricity company.

    • The energy is charged at a lower rate than on an uncontrolled meter.

  2. Uncontrolled meter (also called Anytime, 24 hour)
    • An uncontrolled meter provides constant and unrestricted supply of energy to your appliances at the same price 24 hours a day.

    • By implication, the rate is higher than that of a controlled meter (as it is a constant supply) and cannot be “controlled” by the electricity company.

    • The uncontrolled meter (commonly paired together with the controlled meter) is used to supply primary house connections.

  3. Inclusive meter (also called Composite, All Day Economy, Part controlled)
    • The inclusive meter is a single meter that effectively combines controlled and uncontrolled meters and charges a flat rate for consumption. As a result, the rate from an inclusive meter tends to be lower.

    • Mimicking a controlled meter scenario, inclusive meters implement a device called "ripple relay" to control hot water heating, avoiding unnecessary heating and proving a cheaper unit rate.

  4. Day / Night meters
    • This electricity meter measures electricity used during the day separately from electricity used at night.

    • While it provides a 24-hour unrestricted supply of electricity to the property, it applies two different rates depending on whether energy is supplied during the day period of 7am - 11pm or the night period of 11pm - 7am.

  5. Other power company rates

    Electricity companies may choose to offer additional rates. Some example are as follows:

    • Night only – Electricity is supplied at a discounted rate and available only at certain hours of the night. This is particularly relevant for use on specific appliances such as water cylinders.

    • Peak/Off-peak - Energy is charged at a lower rate during off-peak hours and throughout the weekend. By comparison, higher prices are charged at peak times.

    • Winter/summer – Energy is charged at a higher rate during winter months (May to September) in comparison to summer months (October to April).

Power Company Comparison

  • Power Company Comparison
  • At its basic, power prices in NZ and consequently, the cheapest power company and plan for you depends on where you live and how much electricity you use.

  • Using a specific annual kWh per city for standard users, we have obtained online quotes for [20+ plans from 13 power companies] that are valid as at the time of this article.

  • We ranked the results from lowest to highest in price, taking into account any current discounts and signing bonuses.

  • [Prices are correct as of 31 May 2022. Our research team updates this guide quarterly; the next re-review will be in late July 2022.]

  • We have applied the following discounts in our electricity provider rates comparison in New Zealand:

    1. Mercury 2 year fixed - Sign up bonus: $200, discounts: 10% prompt payment, 2% eBilling
    2. Contact Everyday Bonus Fixed - Sign up bonus: $150, discounts: 2% fixed term
    3. Powershop - Sign up bonus: $150
    4. Mercury 1 year fixed - Sign up bonus: $75, discounts: 10% prompt payment, 2% eBilling
    5. Electric Kiwi - Stay Ahead 200 (Standard) - Discount: $20 off for every $200 paid ahead
    6. Genesis Energy Plus - Discounts: - 2% Direct Debit, 1% eBilling, 3% fixed term

Cheapest Energy Companies in Auckland

Standard Users

  • The table below set out power companies ranked in order of Standard User Power Plans in Auckland
  • The rates are based on an inclusive meter and an annual consumption of [9,108 kWh].
  • The annual charge estimate includes GST.
  • Please know the power companies that offer open plans (i.e. not fixed-term contracts) can increase (or decrease) the prices as they see fit and will give (at least) 30 days' notice (by email usually) of such price changes.
Energy Provider
(Standard User plan) 
Annual charge estimate Contract - Fixed Term or Open?
Electric Kiwi - MoveMaster (Standard) $2,197 Open
Mercury 2 year fixed (Standard) $2,202 Fixed (2 years)
Contact Everyday Bonus Fixed (Standard) $2,373 Fixed
Powershop (Standard) $2,387 Open
Mercury 1 year fixed (Standard) $2,400 Fixed
Frank Energy (Standard) $2,417 Open
Contact Basic Plan (Standard) $2,575 Open
Genesis Energy Basic (Standard) $2,599 Open
Flick Energy Flat (Standard) $2,700 Open
Flick Energy Off Peak (Standard) $2,700 Open
Trustpower (Standard) $2,716 Open
Globug (Standard) $2,720 Open
Electric Kiwi - Stay Ahead 200 (Standard) $2,726 Open
Nova Energy (Standard) $2,771 Open
Electric Kiwi - Loyal Kiwi (Standard) $2,814 Fixed (12 months)
Meridian (Standard) $2,824 Open
Genesis Energy Plus (Standard) $2,849 Open or Fixed
Pulse Energy (Standard) $2,901 Fixed
Electric Kiwi - Kiwi (Standard) $2,936 Open
Ecotricity Eco Anytime (Standard) $2,967 Fixed
Ecotricity Eco Saver (Standard) $2,975 Fixed
Mercury Everyday Rates (Standard) $3,061 Open

Cheapest Energy Companies in Wellington

Standard Users

  • The table below sets out power companies ranked in order of Standard User Power Plans in Wellington.
  • The rates are based on an inclusive meter and an annual consumption of [9,094 kWh].
  • The annual charge estimate includes GST.
  • Please know the power companies that offer open plans (i.e. not fixed-term contracts) can increase (or decrease) the prices as they see fit and will give (at least) 30 days' notice (by email usually) of such price changes.
Energy Provider
(Standard User plan)
Annual charge estimate ​Contract - Fixed Term or Open?
Mercury 1 year fixed (Standard) $2,062 Fixed
Mercury 2 year fixed (Standard) $2,190 ​Fixed (2 years)
Powershop (Standard) $2,290 Open
Contact Everyday Bonus Fixed (Standard) $2,300 Fixed
Electric Kiwi - MoveMaster (Standard) $2,361 Open
Frank Energy (Standard) $2,405 Open
Genesis Energy Basic (Standard) $2,416 Open
Contact Basic Plan (Standard) $2,500 Open
Flick Energy Flat (Standard) $2,572 Open
Flick Energy Off Peak (Standard) $2,572 Open
Meridian (Standard) $2,580 Open
Genesis Energy Plus (Standard) $2,582 Open or Fixed
Trustpower (Standard) $2,631 Open
Globug (Standard) $2,644 Open
Pulse Energy (Standard) $2,694 Fixed
Ecotricity Eco Saver (Standard) $2,694 Fixed
Ecotricity Anytime (Standard) $2,708 Fixed
Nova Energy (Standard) $2,870 Open
Mercury Everyday Rates (Standard) $2,953 Open
Electric Kiwi - Stay Ahead 200 (Standard) $2,964 Open
Electric Kiwi - Loyal Kiwi (Standard) $3,097 Fixed
Electric Kiwi - Kiwi (Standard) $3,203 Open

Cheapest Energy Companies in Christchurch

Standard Users

  • The table below sets out power companies ranked in order of Standard User Power Plans in Christchurch. 
  • The rates are based on an inclusive meter and an annual consumption of [10,210 kWh].
  • The annual charge estimate includes GST.
  • Please know the power companies that offer open plans (i.e. not fixed-term contracts) can increase (or decrease) the prices as they see fit and will give (at least) 30 days' notice (by email usually) of such price changes.
Energy Provider
(Standard User plan)
Annual charge estimate ​Contract - Fixed Term or Open?
Mercury 2 year fixed (Standard) $2,640 Fixed (2 years)
Powershop (Standard) $2,649 Open
Frank Energy (Standard) $2,659 Open
Contact Everyday Bonus Fixed (Standard) $2,659 Fixed
Electric Kiwi - MoveMaster (Standard) $2,665 Open
Mercury 1 year fixed (Standard) $2,776 Fixed
Flick Energy Flat (Standard) $2,838 Open
Contact Basic Plan (Standard) $2,867 Open
Trustpower (Standard) $2,922 Open
Flick Energy Off Peak (Standard) $2,929 Open
Pulse Energy (Standard) $2,940 Fixed
Globug (Standard) $2,941 Open
Nova Energy (Standard) $2,958 Open
Genesis Energy Basic (Standard) $3,007 Open
Ecotricity Eco Saver (Standard) $3,019 Fixed
Ecotricity Eco Anytime (Standard) $3,036 Fixed
Meridian (Standard) $3,039 Open
Genesis Energy Plus (Standard) $3,197 Open or Fixed
Electric Kiwi - Stay Ahead 200 (Standard) $3,266 Open
Mercury Everyday Rates (Standard) $3,305 Open
Electric Kiwi - Loyal Kiwi (Standard) $3,406 Fixed (12 months)
Electric Kiwi - Kiwi (Standard) $3,520 Open

Cheapest Energy Companies in Dunedin

Standard Users

  • The Table below lists Power Companies ranked in order of Standard User Power Plans in Dunedin.
  • The rates are based on an inclusive meter and an annual consumption of [9,916 kWh].
  • The annual charge estimate includes GST.
  • Please know the power companies that offer open plans (i.e. not fixed-term contracts) can increase (or decrease) the prices as they see fit and will give (at least) 30 days' notice (by email usually) of such price changes.
Energy Provider
(Standard User plan)
Annual charge estimate Contract - Fixed Term or Open?
Contact Everyday Bonus Fixed (Standard) $2,331 Fixed
Frank Energy (Standard) $2,451 Open
Powershop (Standard) $2,462 Open
Contact Basic Plan (Standard) $2,532 Open
Mercury 2 year fixed (Standard) $2,552 Fixed (2 years)
Electric Kiwi - MoveMaster (Standard) $2,575 Open
Genesis Energy Basic (Standard) $2,650 Open
Mercury 1 year fixed (Standard) $2,677 Fixed
Globug (Standard) $2,771 Open
Genesis Energy Plus (Standard) $2,860 Open or Fixed
Flick Energy Flat (Standard) $2,870 Open
Flick Energy Flat (Standard) $2,870 Open
Flick Energy Off Peak (Standard) $2,870 Open
Nova Energy (Standard) $2,932 Open
Meridian (Standard) $2,969 Open
Electric Kiwi - Stay Ahead 200 (Standard) $2,979 Open
Trustpower (Standard) $3,063 Open
Mercury Everyday Rates (Standard) $3,127 Open
Electric Kiwi - Loyal Kiwi (Standard) $3,167 Fixed (12 months)
Ecotricity Eco Saver (Standard) $3,188 Fixed
Ecotricity Eco Anytime (Standard) $3,223 Fixed
Electric Kiwi - Kiwi (Standard) $3,274 Open

Disclaimer:

While we try our best to supply you with the most recent and accurate information, and to give you the tools to access the best power prices in New Zealand, we cannot guarantee that our power comparison tool will reduce power bills. Electricity providers in NZ can change their variable plan rates (with 30 days’ notice). The rates are always subject to change.

Electricity Bills - Frequently Asked Questions

Inconsistencies between power providers can make energy costs complex and finding the best deal in New Zealand difficult. To combat the complexities we list frequently asked questions below, with the aim to help you make a better, more informed decision on whether to switch or stay with your current provider.

How do I know if I’m a standard user or a low user?

Your power bill is a good starting point as it has to specify which plan is currently being applied to your household.​ 

Otherwise, as a general rule, if you use less than 8,000 units a year (about 660kWh/month) then a low user plan is best for you. This means that you will generally be paying a lower daily charge and a higher variable charge for each unit of electricity.

A standard user plan will mean a higher daily charge but a lower per kWh (unit) charge. People using more than 8,000 kWh per annum are better off on a standard user plan. This means that the more electricity you’re using, the more likely it is that you’ll be better off on a standard user plan.

What power plan is the best deal for my home?

  • Low user plan is the best fit if you live on the North Island and your annual electricity consumption is less than 7,000 kWh (or 8,000 kWh for those living in the lower parts of the South Island).
  • Standard plan is the best fit if your annual consumption is higher than 9,000 kWh (North Island) or 10,000 kWh (lower parts of the South Island).
  • Custom plans offered by local electricity providers should be considered if your annual consumption sits between 7,000 kWh and 9,000 kWh (North Island) or between 8,000 kWh and 10,000 kWh (lower parts of the South Island). 

Can I switch plans?

Of course! If you are compliant with the consumption thresholds established by the current legislation, you can switch from a standard user plan to a low user plan, or the other way around.​ There is very little standing in the way of you finding the best power prices in New Zealand for you and your family.

What is the average electricity cost per kWh in New Zealand?

In 2021, the average cost of electricity per kWh for residential use was around 29.36 New Zealand cents per kilowatt hour. The specific rates vary from 26 cents (Dunedin) to 33 cents (Rotorua) to 42 cents (Kerikeri).

What information do I need to compare power prices?

To make a full comparison of NZ power company prices and in order to find the best power prices in New Zealand you will need to know your approximate kilowatt-hour use per year, and the cost per kWh in your local area. You will also need to know the daily charge, which will vary between power companies, together with any discounts offered (such as discounts for early payments).

How many kilowatt-hours should I be using each year?

The specific figure will vary from household to household and will depend heavily on your energy efficiency and lifestyle. However, according to the Electricity Authority (EA), an average home in New Zealand should consume 8,000 kWh per year (North Island) or 9,000 kWh per year (lower parts of South Island).

What is the average power bill in New Zealand?

The average New Zealand household will pay between $2,000 to $3,000 a year in electricity. The average power price in New Zealand will, of course, vary depending on various factors such as the number of household members, the type of appliances used, the household's energy efficiency, and of course the electricity supplier, among other factors.

Why do I need a smart electricity meter and how will this benefit my energy bill?

Amongst many benefits, an electricity smart meter will give you the ability to access online tools to easily monitor and manage your power bills and usage in one place. A smart electricity meter will also give you the ability to get more accurate bills as your power company will be getting up-to-date data from your meter, reducing the need to estimate your power usage.

By providing more accurate information, smart meters can help lower your electricity bill by making sure accurate information about your energy consumption is sent through to the power provider, preventing your power company from using an "estimate" method being applied.

How do I turn electricity back on with a smart meter?

While there are a number different types of smart electricity meters on the market, and the actual procedure might differ from one another, in general the following steps should be followed to turn electricity back on with a smart meter:

  1. Press the ‘select’ button (if your electricity meter has one).
  2. The message ‘press B for elec’ will appear on the screen. We note the message may vary but the message itself should direct you to an electricity screen.
  3. Press the ‘B’ button (or equivalent as required to enter the required electricity screen).
  4. The dial should show a question ‘En supply?’ (or a similar message to enable electricity). The screen should give you options of ‘A=No’ and ‘B=Yes’ (or similar).
  5. Press the ‘B’ button (or equivalent).
  6. The message ‘supply enabled’ should appear on the screen.

Note that your electricity smart meter screen should update every eight seconds. To stop the screen changing, press the ‘select’ button. 

If you cannot find similar options or are having trouble with your electricity smart meter, contact your power company for further instructions.

What’s the difference between kWh and kW?

The main difference between kWh and kW is in what they measure. Simply put, a kilowatt is a measure of power and a kilowatt-hour is a measure of energy; power is the rate at which something uses energy, and energy is the capacity to do work. 

A kilowatt is simply a measure of how much power an electric appliance consumes.

A kilowatt-hour measures the energy an appliance uses in kilowatts per hour. For example, if you clean your floors with a 1,000-watt vacuum cleaner for one hour, you consume 1 kWh of energy.

When you see kWh on your monthly energy bill, it’s a measurement of your electric appliances’ wattage and the amount of time you use them.

What is the difference between transmission and distribution?

Simply put, transmission lines help in the movement of electricity from a power plant or power station to the various substations whereas distribution lines carry electricity from the substation to the consumer’s end. 

In practice, transmission lines require huge poles and thick cables to carry the power throughout New Zealand. Distribution lines, on the other hand, use smaller poles, transformers, and cables of smaller diameter to carry the necessary amount of energy to households.

Why does the cost of transmission and distribution vary from place to place in New Zealand?

Even the most remote areas of New Zealand require transmission lines to run electricity.  However, given the remoteness and difficult topography, the cost of maintaining these lines tends to be higher. The same principle applies to the distribution lines.

What is the ICP number?

ICP is your Installation Control Point (ICP), this will be listed on your bill, usually near your account number, or your physical address.

Can I change my meter type?

Yes, but this change might come at a cost. For example, if you are on an uncontrolled meter type but would like to sign up to a day/night plan, you would need to change your meter installation. If this is the case, it's highly likely you'll need to pay the cost of installation while the power company covers the cost of the metre per CAB guidance.

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Peter Allport , 2024-02-23

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